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It’s Giveaway Time! Here’s your chance to win in the KND & BookGorilla giveaway where YOU pick the prize! And check out the great deal we have on William Massa’s The Hexecutioner Books 1-10

Susan and Sarah. Sisters. Best friends. Nothing could break them apart. Until they meet him… The Twins by J.S. Lark

First baby of the New Year…delivered by a cowboy! The Cowboy Is A Daddy by Mindy Neff

All Jules Nichols wants is a quiet life with a happy family. So she comes up with a plan to get rid of her abusive hubby…. One Fine Mess by Mark Petersen

Theseus can never stop fighting, first to win the crown and then to keep it… Fateful Pathways: A Story of Theseus by Bill Hiatt

It’s Giveaway Time! Here’s your chance to win in the KND & BookGorilla giveaway where YOU pick the prize! And check out the great deal we have on Toni Patrick’s 101 Things To Do With Ramen Noodles

“Fans of the Hunger Games and Divergent will obsess over Jay Flaherty’s novel.” —Sheldon Siegel, NYT bestselling author…. The Sphelix by Jay Flaherty

Chilling and unsettling… Readers looking for a page-turning thriller will not be disappointed: Season of Waiting by Jim Christopher

The best things in life are forbidden… Enemy Dearest by Wall Street Journal and #1 Amazon bestselling author Winter Renshaw

10-in-1 BOXED SET ALERT! He is the Hexecutioner, punisher of otherworldly evil… The Hexecutioner Books 1-10: The Complete Series by William Massa

“Action-adventure and dark-edged Sci-Fi that will enthrall readers.” – Kirkus Reviews… When The Children Come by Barry Kirwan

It’s Giveaway Time! Here’s your chance to win in the KND & BookGorilla giveaway where YOU pick the prize! And check out the great deal we have on Tina Dirmann’s Such Good Boys

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Read beyond Hillbilly Elegy with these stories of the American working class

From The Los Angeles Times: Four books you should read instead of ‘Hillbilly Elegy’… Support our news coverage by subscribing to our Kindle Nation Daily Digest. Joining is free right now!


Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth by [Sarah Smarsh]Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth

by Sarah Smarsh
Kindle price: $12.99

An essential read for our times: an eye-opening memoir of working-class poverty in America that will deepen our understanding of the ways in which class shapes our country and “a deeply humane memoir that crackles with clarifying insight”.*

Sarah Smarsh was born a fifth generation Kansas wheat farmer on her paternal side, and the product of generations of teen mothers on her maternal side. Through her experiences growing up on a farm thirty miles west of Wichita, we are given a unique and essential look into the lives of poor and working class Americans living in the heartland.

During Sarah’s turbulent childhood in Kansas in the 1980s and 1990s, she enjoyed the freedom of a country childhood, but observed the painful challenges of the poverty around her; untreated medical conditions for lack of insurance or consistent care, unsafe job conditions, abusive relationships, and limited resources and information that would provide for the upward mobility that is the American Dream. By telling the story of her life and the lives of the people she loves with clarity and precision but without judgement, Smarsh challenges us to look more closely at the class divide in our country.

Beautifully written, in a distinctive voice, Heartland combines personal narrative with powerful analysis and cultural commentary, challenging the myths about people thought to be less because they earn less.

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What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia by [Elizabeth Catte]What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia

by Elizabeth Catte
Kindle price: $6.99

In 2016, headlines declared Appalachia ground zero for America’s “forgotten tribe” of white working class voters. Journalists flocked to the region to extract sympathetic profiles of families devastated by poverty, abandoned by establishment politics, and eager to consume cheap campaign promises. What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia is a frank assessment of America’s recent fascination with the people and problems of the region. The book analyzes trends in contemporary writing on Appalachia, presents a brief history of Appalachia with an eye toward unpacking Appalachian stereotypes, and provides examples of writing, art, and policy created by Appalachians as opposed to for Appalachians. The book offers a must-needed insider’s perspective on the region.

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Mill Town: Reckoning with What Remains by [Kerri Arsenault]Mill Town: Reckoning with What Remains

by Kerri Arsenault
Kindle price: $14.99

Kerri Arsenault grew up in the rural working class town of Mexico, Maine. For over 100 years the community orbited around a paper mill that employs most townspeople, including three generations of Arsenault’s own family. Years after she moved away, Arsenault realized the price she paid for her seemingly secure childhood. The mill, while providing livelihoods for nearly everyone, also contributed to the destruction of the environment and the decline of the town’s economic, physical, and emotional health in a slow-moving catastrophe, earning the area the nickname “Cancer Valley.”

Mill Town is a personal investigation, where Arsenault sifts through historical archives and scientific reports, talks to family and neighbors, and examines her own childhood to illuminate the rise and collapse of the working-class, the hazards of loving and leaving home, and the ambiguous nature of toxins and disease. Mill Town is a moral wake-up call that asks, Whose lives are we willing to sacrifice for our own survival?

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Digging Our Own Graves: Coal Miners and the Struggle over Black Lung Disease by [Barbara Ellen Smith, Earl Dotter]Digging Our Own Graves: Coal Miners and the Struggle over Black Lung Disease

by Barbara Ellen Smith
Kindle price: $14.99

Employment and production in the Appalachian coal industry have plummeted over recent decades. But the lethal black lung disease, once thought to be near-eliminated, affects miners at rates never before recorded.

Digging Our Own Graves sets this epidemic in the context of the brutal assault, begun in the 1980s and continued since, on the United Mine Workers of America and the collective power of rank-and-file coal miners in the heart of the Appalachian coalfields. This destruction of militancy and working class power reveals the unacknowledged social and political roots of a health crisis that is still barely acknowledged by the state and coal industry.

Barbara Ellen Smith’s essential study, now with an updated introduction and conclusion, charts the struggles of miners and their families from the birth of the Black Lung Movement in 1968 to the present-day importance of demands for environmental justice through proposals like the Green New Deal. Through extensive interviews with participants and her own experiences as an activist, the author provides a vivid portrait of communities struggling for survival against the corporate extraction of labor, mineral wealth, and the very breath of those it sends to dig their own graves.

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