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What time is it? It’s GIVEAWAY time! Check out Bellingwood Boxed Set: Books 1-3 by Diane Greenwood Muir and find out how you can enter! All Free!

A magical coming-of-age story from Coretta Scott King honor author Jewell Parker Rhodes, rich with Southern folklore, friendship, family, fireflies and mermaids, plus an environmental twist: Bayou Magic

There are secrets only the dead can tell. And some of these secrets refuse to remain buried… The Girl and The Field of Bones by A.J. Rivers

The more you look for love in all the wrong places, the more you wonder if it was right in front of your nose all along… The Dating Itinerary by Brooke Williams

The battle for mankind’s future is upon us… and it rests in the hands of one forgotten soldier… Exodus Ark by J.N. Chaney

Live a better, longer life AND enjoy every moment of it… Unlock Bliss: A Memoir Of Getting Happier by Dr. Zeev Gilkis

What time is it? It’s GIVEAWAY time! Check out A Lotus Grows In The Mud by Goldie Hawn and find out how you can enter!

She shouldn’t have stayed. Now she can’t leave…. Blood Secret by Jaye Ford

Perfect for not-so-scary storytime: Halloween With Snowman Paul by Yossi Lapid

This is not a fairy tale. This is about real witches: The Witches by Roald Dahl

Telling her smoking hot boss that she was married seemed like a good idea at the time…. Working Stiff: Runaway Billionaires #1 by Blair Babylon

For fans of THE DA VINCI CODE, THE RED TENT and THE CONFESSIONS OF YOUNG NERO: The Mystery Of Julia Episcopa by John I. Rigoli and Diane Cummings

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Publetariat Dispatch: Why the Decision to Kill Off a Character Can Be Murder on an Author

Publetariat: For People Who Publish!In today’s Publetariat Dispatch, Crime Fiction Collective author Andrew E. Kaufman talks about the repercussions of killing off a character.

 

This post, by Andrew E. Kaufman, originally appeared on The Crime Fiction Collective blog and is reprinted here in its entirety with that site’s permission.

Somewhere during the course of my novels, someone has to die—actually, several people do. That’s just the nature of the beast. My stories revolve around evil-doers, and most will stop at nothing to get what they want. Even murder. And really, what’s a mystery without a body or three?

That’s not to say writing them is easy—it isn’t. For an author, killing off characters is a big responsibility and in some cases, risky business. After all, plotting a novel is one thing—plotting a murder is completely another. It has to make sense, has to fit in with the story, and most importantly, has to move things forward in a logical manner. Kill the wrong character and you could wind up with a real mess on your hands (so to speak). The effects can be catastrophic, throwing everything completely off-balance. I know this because on occasion it’s happened to me, and when it has I’ve had to chuck the entire story and start all over again. Trust me, folks, it’s no fun: we’re talking pull-your-hair-out-of your-head, gnash-your-teeth-to-powder sort of moments.

Then there’s the emotional side. Like readers, we get attached to our characters, too, probably even more so. For me, they’re like my children. I created them, and sometimes I hate to see them go. So when the story dictates that one of them must die, it can be troublesome, to say the least. I often don’t want to do it. I struggle. That’s when I have to step away from my feelings and remember that it’s all about the story. The good news is that hopefully, if I’m feeling the pain, the reader might, too. Maybe it’s a sign I’m getting it right. Or maybe it’s just a sign that I’ve lost my mind. Not sure which.

And there are other risks, implications which can occur off the page. Killing the wrong character can make readers really angry.

That’s what happened to Karin Slaughter (SPOILER ALERT) a few years back when she ended the life of one of her most beloved characters. It created a huge backlash. Readers were furious, many accusing her of doing it for the shock value and vowing to never pick up another one of her books again. It got so bad in fact that Slaughter ended up having to post a letter on her website explaining her decision. Not sure whether it made a difference, but as an author I can understand what she went through.

So what about you? Readers: ever been really upset over the death of a character? And authors: What have your experiences been while offing one of your peeps?

Let’s chat.

 

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