Kindle Jumps Ahead of Competitors in Library Lending: Kindle Books Now Available — and Delivered Wirelessly! — at over 11,000 Local Libraries

Amazon has just announced the immediate availability of a feature that we have been waiting for since the Kindle’s launch almost four years ago — public library lending for Kindle books at over 11,000 local libraries.

While that “11,000” figure is an important one, an equally important number will be the one that counts how many Kindle books are available for library-based borrowing. A first look at the Seattle Public Library’s Kindle offerings suggests that about a little over 25,000 Kindle books are available for borrowing on Day 1 — that’s less than 2.5 percent of the total Kindle catalog of 1,014,555 titles as of this morning.

Importantly, the library lending feature for Kindle is the first ebook platform to feature wireless delivery for library lending, which is likely to provide a major advantage for Kindle over its competitors.

A second important advantage for the Kindle library lending platform involves the fact that public library ebook borrowers will be include, in the words of Amazon’s Kindle director Jay Marine, “extending our Whispersync technology to library books, so your notes, highlights and bookmarks are always backed up and available the next time you check out the book or if you decide to buy the book.” 

The extension of these annotation, highlighting and bookmarking features to the Kindle library lending platform is bound to turn borrowing into buying for many readers — something that may help Amazon convince publishers and authors to expand their participating in the program.

Here’s the rundown on how to use the service from Amazon’s new Library Lending Kindle page:

You can check out a Kindle book from your local library and read it on any generation Kindle device or free Kindle reading app.When you borrow a Kindle public library book, you’ll have access to all
the unique features of Kindle books, including real page numbers and
Whispersync technology that synchronizes your notes, highlights, and
last page read. After a public library book expires, if you check it
out again or choose to purchase it from the Kindle store, all of your
annotations and bookmarks will be preserved.Kindle books are available at more than 11,000 libraries in the U.S.

How It Works

You can borrow Kindle books from your local library’s website and, with
the click of a button, have them delivered to your Kindle device or free
reading app.

• Visit the website of a U.S. library that offers digital services from OverDrive.

• Check out a Kindle book (using a valid library card).

• Click on “Get for Kindle” and then sign in to your Amazon.com account
to have the book delivered to your Kindle device or reading app.

Note: Public library books can be sent wirelessly to Kindle devices via an active Wi-Fi connection or transferred via USB.

Kindle for Public Libraries: How It Works

Help

For technical assistance and frequently asked questions, please visit the Helppage at http://amzn.to/KINDLE-LIBRARY-HELP

For questions about availability of Kindle library books, loan duration, and terms of use, please contact your local library.

We welcome your feedback at
kindle-publiclibraries-feedback@amazon.com.

Here’s the guts of Amazon’s press release this morning:

Kindle Books Now Available 
at over 11,000 Local Libraries

 

Kindle the only e-reader to deliver library books wirelessly; read on
any Kindle or free Kindle app
 
Amazon’s Whispersync technology automatically stores and synchronizes
bookmarks, margin notes and highlights – all available the next time you
check out or buy the book
 

SEATTLE, Sep 21, 2011 (BUSINESS WIRE) — (NASDAQ: AMZN)-Amazon.com today announced that Kindle and Kindle app
customers can now borrow Kindle books from more than 11,000 local
libraries in the United States. When a customer borrows a Kindle library
book, they’ll have all of the unique features they love about Kindle
books, including Whispersync, which automatically synchronizes their
margin notes, highlights and bookmarks, real page numbers, Facebook and
Twitter integration, and more. For more information about borrowing
library books for your Kindle or free Kindle apps, go to www.amazon.com/kindle/publiclibraries.
To start checking out Kindle library books, visit your local library’s
website.

“Starting today, millions of Kindle customers can borrow Kindle books
from their local libraries,” said Jay Marine, Director, Amazon Kindle.
“Libraries are a critical part of our communities and we’re excited to
be making Kindle books available at more than 11,000 local libraries
around the country. We’re even doing a little extra here – normally,
making margin notes in library books is a big no-no. But we’re fixing
this by extending our Whispersync technology to library books, so your
notes, highlights and bookmarks are always backed up and available the
next time you check out the book or if you decide to buy the book.”

Customers will use their local library’s website to search for and
select a book to borrow. Once they choose a book, customers can choose
to “Send to Kindle” and will be redirected to Amazon.com to login to
their Amazon.com account and the book will be delivered to the device
they select via Wi-Fi, or can be transferred via USB. Customers can
check out a Kindle book from their local library and start reading on
any generation Kindle device or free Kindle app for Android, iPad, iPod
touch, iPhone, PC, Mac, BlackBerry or Windows Phone, as well as in their
web browser with Kindle Cloud Reader.

“This is a welcome day for Kindle users in libraries everywhere and
especially our Kindle users here at The Seattle Public Library,” said
Marcellus Turner, city librarian for The Seattle Public Library. “We’re
thrilled that Amazon is offering such a new approach to library ebooks
that enhances the reader experience.”

When borrowing a Kindle book from their local library, customers can
take advantage of all of the unique features of Kindle books, including:

  • Whispersync technology wirelessly sync your books, notes, highlights,
    and last page read across Kindle and free Kindle reading apps
  • Real Page Numbers let you easily reference passages with page numbers
    that correspond to actual print editions
  • Facebook and Twitter integration makes it easy to share favorite
    passages with your social networks
  • Popular Highlights show you what our community of millions of Kindle
    readers think are the most interesting passages in your books
  • Public Notes allow you to share your notes and see what others are
    saying about Kindle books

To start checking out Kindle library books, visit your local library’s
website.

 

 

24 Responses to Kindle Jumps Ahead of Competitors in Library Lending: Kindle Books Now Available — and Delivered Wirelessly! — at over 11,000 Local Libraries

  1. DM September 22, 2011 at 10:09 am #

    Libraries in Vermont already have this turned on. There is not alot of selection but it is still there. Keep checking back to your library. The bigger areas should respond quickly if the state of Vermont is already covered.

  2. kate September 22, 2011 at 5:16 am #

    If I have a valid library card to a participating library, can I check out ebooks to my kindle if I am living overseas?

    • Kindle Nation September 22, 2011 at 9:40 am #

      I’m sorry, but I can’t answer that question. I think you’ll have to ask the library you’re intending to use.

  3. nanette September 22, 2011 at 12:18 am #

    when will this service be available internationally?

    • Kindle Nation September 22, 2011 at 12:21 am #

      Sorry, but I can’t provide any more information than what Amazon has released about the program. Since Amazon has a UK store and a Canadian store, hopefully this is in the works.

  4. Linda September 21, 2011 at 7:09 pm #

    I live in Podunk, USA. This will not happen in this area. Where are these “local” libraries? Is there a list? When I first tried to check on this, it seems that the “non-local” libraries had a membership fee (not cheap), to use their Kindle ebook lending, so what’s it really good for, if we don’t have access, or the money for “membership”?

    • Kindle Nation September 21, 2011 at 7:12 pm #

      I’m sorry this new program isn’t going to help you out much, but you can always check our listings of free and 99-cent Kindle books to find free and nearly free books!

  5. Lauren Flattery September 21, 2011 at 5:07 pm #

    And what about Canada? Seriously, folks. We are tired of being an afterthought.

  6. P.Montgomery September 21, 2011 at 4:27 pm #

    Just be aware that you can’t download these Overdrive Kindle eBook loans directly to your Kindle using WiFi, unless you have the Kindle3. All the other older Kindles out there will have to be loaded using your USB cord.

    Our Pima County Overdrive in Tucson still isn’t up for Kindle eBook borrowing.

  7. Tara September 21, 2011 at 4:15 pm #

    Brevard County (FL) libraries are working with OverDrive. They don’t list the Kindle as a non-usable e-book reader anymore, but they also don’t list it as a usable e-book reader either.

    After reading this and POURING over their website in hopes of finding the Kindle lending button, it’s just not there.

    Disheartening.

    • Kindle Nation September 21, 2011 at 4:19 pm #

      Since this library lending service is brand new, it may take a little while for participating libraries to work out the kinks. I’d suggest you contact your library and ask if or when they plan to start lending Kindle books. Good luck!

  8. D. Robert Pease September 21, 2011 at 3:42 pm #

    Overdrive doesn’t support indie authors though, so don’t expect any self-published books in your library any time soon.

    • Kindle Nation September 21, 2011 at 3:48 pm #

      Actually, OverDrive allows anyone to set up a ‘publisher’ account. However, it’s true that they don’t like to invest their resources in individual ‘publishers’ who only have 1-2 books in print. Indie authors with a larger catalog (sorry, I can’t say exactly how many books the author must have, that’s OverDrive’s call) just need to apply for a ‘publisher’ account.

      • D. Robert Pease September 21, 2011 at 3:54 pm #

        Yeah, I think you are right, now that I think about it. I just have the one book out now, so I remember I couldn’t sign up. Thanks for setting me straight.

  9. Marlene Fast September 21, 2011 at 3:16 pm #

    Any idea when this will come to Canada??

    • Kindle Nation September 21, 2011 at 3:41 pm #

      Sorry, we can’t tell when specific libraries will adopt this new policy, or which ones will elect to adopt it at all. You’d need to check with any libraries you frequent to see if they plan to participate, and if so, how soon.

  10. Chris Wheeler September 21, 2011 at 11:11 am #

    Wish our library would come into the 21st century…

  11. Roxanne Rhoads September 21, 2011 at 10:59 am #

    This is so awesome- what a great way to get ebooks out there for people to read

  12. shiela jackson September 21, 2011 at 10:47 am #

    Nashville public library doesn’t know anything about kindle….HELP

    • Jolly September 21, 2011 at 12:01 pm #

      I just read your post and I’m really disappointed. I was just at the downtown Nashville Public Library yesterday and when I read that Kindle is now lending books via Kindle I was really excited! Do you know when the NPL might offer this feature?

      • Kindle Nation September 21, 2011 at 3:40 pm #

        Sorry, we don’t have any kind of database of information to refer to on this. It’s a question you’ll have to direct to the library you’re interested in directly.

    • Stefan September 21, 2011 at 7:26 pm #

      Nashville Public library is offering this feature, http://emedia.library.nashville.org/60B13C73-BF2E-4C26-BD86-3F69C1E54259/10/475/en/Default.htm

      I just checked out several. Enjoy!!

  13. Julie September 21, 2011 at 10:41 am #

    YES!!! Color me happy!!!!!

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